What did WAAAF do?

02/06/2020 Off By admin

What did WAAAF do?

Women of the WAAAF worked in more than 70 different musterings across the entire organisation, including as truck drivers, signallers, electricians and anti-gas instructors. They also worked on machine guns, in repair shops, in mess rooms, in hospitals and in parachute sections. They worked wherever they were needed.

When did the WAAAF start?

March 1941
Women’s Auxiliary Australian Air Force/Founded

The Women’s Auxiliary Australian Air Force (WAAAF) was formed in March 1941 after considerable lobbying by women keen to serve and by the Chief of the Air Staff who wanted to release male personnel serving in Australia for service overseas. The WAAAF was the largest of the Second World War women’s services.

Who founded the WAAAF?

Support for the WAAAF came as early as June 1940, with notable backing from New South Wales Premier Alexander Mair and Chief of the Air Staff Sir Charles Burnett. Burnett had two daughters who had previously served in the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force in the UK.

When was the WAAF disbanded?

The Women’s Royal Air Force was disbanded in 1920 and then reformed in 1939 as the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force.

What was the land army in ww2?

The Women’s Land Army (WLA) was established in World War One, but was re-founded shortly before the outbreak of World War Two, in June 1939, to provide extra agricultural labour. The government feared that if war broke out there would be food shortages.

What did the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force do in ww2?

The Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF) was formed in June 1939 when war seemed imminent again. Many members of the WAAF worked in the radar control system as reporters and plotters. Their work was vital during the Battle of Britain and later in guiding night-fighter aeroplanes against German bombers.

What was the WAAF in ww2?

The Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF) was formed in June 1939 when war seemed imminent again. Initially, members of the WAAF were recruited to fill posts as clerks, kitchen orderlies and drivers, in order to release men for front-line duties.

What jobs did the WAAF do in ww2?

They were mechanics, engineers, electricians and fitters for aeroplanes. They undertook the interpretation of aerial photographs and provided weather reports. Many members of the WAAF worked in the radar control system as reporters and plotters.

Did farmers have to go to war in ww2?

And then, once they realised what was available, then farmers were instructed to grow various crops. But the best farmers were encouraged to join the War Ag and in fact they would spill the beans on the neighbours.

Who created Dig for Victory?

the British Ministry of Agriculture
The ‘Dig for Victory’ campaign was set up during WWII by the British Ministry of Agriculture. Men and women across the country were encouraged to grow their own food in times of harsh rationing.

How did ww2 change women’s lives?

World War II changed the lives of women and men in many ways. Most women labored in the clerical and service sectors where women had worked for decades, but the wartime economy created job opportunities for women in heavy industry and wartime production plants that had traditionally belonged to men.

When did they start using daylight savings time?

History of Daylight Saving Time (DST) By Anne Buckle. Daylight Saving Time (DST) is used to save energy and make better use of daylight. It was first used in 1908 in Thunder Bay, Canada. DST makes for longer evenings. ŠiStockphoto.com/Lacheev.

When was the WAAAF disbanded after World War 2?

With the end of World War II, the WAAAF was progressively disbanded, with the last members demobilised in July 1947. The quiet dignity with which the WAAAF served won praise and admiration, not just from the men of the Air Force, but from the entire community.

What did the women do for the WAAAF?

As the strength of the WAAAF increased, its members began to invade the traditional male dominated areas. Women of the WAAAF worked in more than 70 different musterings across the entire organisation, including as truck drivers, signallers, electricians and anti-gas instructors.

Why did the WAAAF use a hessian bag?

One 18-year-old recruit to the WAAAF was handed a hessian bag and told to use a pitchfork to fill it with straw for her bed and, thinking bigger is better, she piled as much straw into that bag as possible. After a restless and somewhat painful night, she removed a good portion of the straw.